Emergency/Out of hours care

Accessing urgent care when the surgery is closed


If you need emergency assistance for a life threatening condition dial 999 to request an ambulance.



If you need to speak to a doctor or nurse outside of surgery hours, health advice is available from Surrey’s NHS 111 service. The service runs from 6.30pm on weekdays until 8am the following morning and all day during weekends and bank holidays. If you have an urgent medical problem which cannot wait until the surgery re-opens, you can contact NHS 111 by dialling 111 from either your landline or mobile. NHS 111 is free to call from both mobiles and landlines. 

The NHS 111 service is staffed by a team of fully trained advisers, supported by experienced nurses and paramedics. They will ask you questions to assess your symptoms, then give you the healthcare advice you need or direct you straightaway to the local service that can help you best. That could be A&E, an out-of-hours doctor, an urgent care centre or a , a community nurse, an emergency dentist or a late-opening chemist. Where possible, the NHS 111 team will book you an appointment or transfer you directly to the people you need to speak to.

Always call 999 in a critical or life-threatening situation, for example if someone loses consciousness, is in a confused state, has severe chest pain, breathing difficulties or severe bleeding that can't be stopped.  If you or someone else is having a heart attack or stroke, call 999 immediately - every second counts with these conditions.




Please contact them initially rather than attending casualty directly, as most problems can be resolved without having to endure a long wait in casualty.

For emergencies dial 999

Training of Doctors

This practice has been accredited as being suitable for the training of those doctors intending to become general practitioners.

This means that the practice and doctors have had to achieve a number of standards which have been assessed by the Deanery for Kent, Surrey and Sussex.

These are some points for your information:

  • Those doctors training to become GPs are called GP Registrars. They are employed by the practice.
  • The GP Registrar is a fully qualified doctor who is likely to have a lot of experience of hospital medicine.
  • Sometimes other doctors are also trained and supported in the practice.
  • If you are seeing a Registrar, you can expect to receive the quality of service you would get from your own GP. If you have any concerns, please mention this to a member of staff.
  • In order for the Registrars to successfully complete their training, they need to be assessed on their consulting skills. This is done by the appointed assessors viewing a video of the registrars consultations. You may be asked for your permission to have your consultation recorded in this way. If you agree, you will need to give your written permission by signing a consent form available at reception desk, which will be offered to you. If the doctor appears to be recording your consultation and you have not signed a consent form, you should indicate this to him or her immediately. The recording will be used for educational purposes only. Further information about this process and the confidentiality of it, can be obtained from the reception staff.
  • In addition to training Registrars, the surgery also occasionally provides training to medical students, usually in their final year of training. These students may be present at your consultation, but only with your permission. If you do not wish the student to be present, please advise the GP.